A huge thank you to the wonderful Sally! You have been absolutely brilliant! Good luck with your next big adventure. We can’t to see your new arrival! Lots of love from all at TTV X
Great to share chocolates and ideas with the brilliant Kash and Shabs, the stars of our BBC3 show, Supercar, Superfam.
Transparent Televisions latest production explores the highs and lows of the Tory Party. Coming to Channel 5 soon. Watch this space...

Broadcast Magazine. 29th May 2019.

Diverse indies bet on digital.

BAME-led indies say they are getting more interest from new players than UK broadcasters.

Netflix, Amazon and other digital giants are providing new opportunities for diverse talent, according to more than a dozen BAME indies interviewed by Broadcast.

Big Deal Films managing director Dhanny Joshi said that SVoD platforms have been quick to see the benefits of working with BAME talent despite being relatively new to the UK market.

“There are not so many barriers because shows such as Orange Is The New Black and Dear White People have had such good numbers. It makes good business sense for them to work with BAME-led indies,” he said.

Joshi added that Netflix vice-president of content Anne Mensah has been very open to new ideas, easing the process for a BAME-led indie to pitch to Netflix.

TriForce Creative Network chief executive Fraser Ayres also claimed there is a lot more interest from the likes of Netflix and Amazon than UK broadcasters, and that they offer quicker decision-making.

Ayres said it can prove almost impossible to develop projects and keep the lights on when commissioners can take years, not months, to respond to pitches.

Gold Wala founder Faraz Osman said YouTube Originals and online platform Vevo are also providing opportunities for BAME indies because they want content for young global audiences that are craving more diversity.

“Our heritage and ethnic understanding puts us in a strong position to pitch ideas to territories such as India and the Asian subcontinent,” he added. “Netflix allows us to do that and we hope the SVoDs and online platforms will be the next step for our business.”

“It would make sense to have commissioners in the same age bracket as the market that they are working in”

Bentavision Studios head Samuell Benta said he has self-published on YouTube because commissioners do not always understand the firm’s voice or the demands of a younger generation.

“It would make sense to have commissioners in the same age bracket as the market that they are working in,” said Benta. “I have seen fear act as a motivating factor for decisions, and have seen commissioners stick to what they know, rather than take risks. The industry will be the same, the content will be the same, unless something different is done that requires a new way of thinking.”

One indie boss praised the support it received from Channel 4 but said it has been difficult to break through to commissioners from all broadcasters due to being pigeonholed as a diverse producer rather than as a creative equal to other indies.

Asked which changes would help diverse-led indies land more work, BAME bosses favoured the introduction of diversity production quotas and greater diversity among the commissioning community.

Transparent TV chief executive Jazz Gowans said the biggest changes would be governed by economics.

“Quite simply, people always go where the business is,” she said. “So diversity production quotas and tax breaks would be the biggest help for landing more work.”

Another indie exec also flagged the importance of money, suggesting that diversity can “sometimes be pushed to the edges of the schedule, with lower tariffs attached”.

A third added: “Ensuring diverse talent is working on shows will sometimes involve taking a risk. With tight budgets and schedules, we’re all reluctant to do that, as we know we producers will have to foot the bill if it doesn’t work out.”

Gold Wala’s Osman said he would like to see commissioners outline ‘tight’ briefs that have a guaranteed slot attached. “For example, if a broadcaster wants to give Christmas a fresh look, they could go to five indies from different backgrounds, to see what their take is,” said Osman.

“Broadcasters would get fresh ideas, and smaller indies would feel empowered as there’s a good chance they might get the work – rather than the free-for-all where we are competing against much bigger indies.”
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Broadcast Magazine. 29th May 2019.

Diverse indies bet on digital.

BAME-led indies say they are getting more interest from new players than UK broadcasters.

Netflix, Amazon and other digital giants are providing new opportunities for diverse talent, according to more than a dozen BAME indies interviewed by Broadcast.

Big Deal Films managing director Dhanny Joshi said that SVoD platforms have been quick to see the benefits of working with BAME talent despite being relatively new to the UK market.

“There are not so many barriers because shows such as Orange Is The New Black and Dear White People have had such good numbers. It makes good business sense for them to work with BAME-led indies,” he said.

Joshi added that Netflix vice-president of content Anne Mensah has been very open to new ideas, easing the process for a BAME-led indie to pitch to Netflix.

TriForce Creative Network chief executive Fraser Ayres also claimed there is a lot more interest from the likes of Netflix and Amazon than UK broadcasters, and that they offer quicker decision-making.

Ayres said it can prove almost impossible to develop projects and keep the lights on when commissioners can take years, not months, to respond to pitches.

Gold Wala founder Faraz Osman said YouTube Originals and online platform Vevo are also providing opportunities for BAME indies because they want content for young global audiences that are craving more diversity.

“Our heritage and ethnic understanding puts us in a strong position to pitch ideas to territories such as India and the Asian subcontinent,” he added. “Netflix allows us to do that and we hope the SVoDs and online platforms will be the next step for our business.”

“It would make sense to have commissioners in the same age bracket as the market that they are working in”

Bentavision Studios head Samuell Benta said he has self-published on YouTube because commissioners do not always understand the firm’s voice or the demands of a younger generation.

“It would make sense to have commissioners in the same age bracket as the market that they are working in,” said Benta. “I have seen fear act as a motivating factor for decisions, and have seen commissioners stick to what they know, rather than take risks. The industry will be the same, the content will be the same, unless something different is done that requires a new way of thinking.”

One indie boss praised the support it received from Channel 4 but said it has been difficult to break through to commissioners from all broadcasters due to being pigeonholed as a diverse producer rather than as a creative equal to other indies.

Asked which changes would help diverse-led indies land more work, BAME bosses favoured the introduction of diversity production quotas and greater diversity among the commissioning community.

Transparent TV chief executive Jazz Gowans said the biggest changes would be governed by economics. 

“Quite simply, people always go where the business is,” she said. “So diversity production quotas and tax breaks would be the biggest help for landing more work.”

Another indie exec also flagged the importance of money, suggesting that diversity can “sometimes be pushed to the edges of the schedule, with lower tariffs attached”.

A third added: “Ensuring diverse talent is working on shows will sometimes involve taking a risk. With tight budgets and schedules, we’re all reluctant to do that, as we know we producers will have to foot the bill if it doesn’t work out.”

Gold Wala’s Osman said he would like to see commissioners outline ‘tight’ briefs that have a guaranteed slot attached. “For example, if a broadcaster wants to give Christmas a fresh look, they could go to five indies from different backgrounds, to see what their take is,” said Osman.

“Broadcasters would get fresh ideas, and smaller indies would feel empowered as there’s a good chance they might get the work – rather than the free-for-all where we are competing against much bigger indies.”

Broadcast Magazine. 29th May 2019.

BAME-led indies locked out

Producers claim they are still not trusted to deliver diverse shows despite better credentials

The UK’s BAME-led production community say broadcasters have a greater appetite for diverse programming than ever before – but claim they are not trusted to deliver it.

Broadcast spoke to 14 indies including Roughcut TV, Douglas Road Productions and Transparent TV about their experiences. A major theme to emerge is that the group still struggle to land commissions despite often having the most authentic experience of diverse topics and narratives.

“We are starting to see more ‘diverse’ work being commissioned, but it is being made by predominantly white, privileged companies, which are then coming to us for talent,” said Fraser Ayres, chief executive and co-founder of Triforce Creative Network and subsidiary Triforce Productions.

“And the same commissioners are not responding to many companies that are already in a position to tell these stories authentically.”

Other issues raised in the interviews include a lack of access to commissioners and their preference for a stereotyped view of what constitutes a diverse narrative.

One indie boss said that a mainly white commissioner class is unconsciously failing to understand that BAME creatives see stories differently to them. “And if they do see that difference, they often don’t give it an equal value,” added the producer.

In February, the issue of authenticity was raised by a group of East Asian-British writers, who claimed it was “indefensible” that CBBC sitcom Living With The Lams had been initially developed and scripted with little input from writers and creatives from that community.

Josh Wilson, managing director of Chasing The Dream producer Wilson Worldwide Productions, told Broadcast he is increasingly concerned by the industry seeming to equate diverse people with a lack of qualifications.

“This is a narrow-minded way of thinking,” he said. “I consistently hear the term ‘training schemes’ when it comes to diverse individuals. Of course, training is important for everyone in the industry, but it shouldn’t be used as a reason to keep the door shut – as if what we do is rocket-science.”

Another common theme was a complaint about the informal culture of commissioning. One indie boss said: “Not everyone can be related to a high-profile newspaper columnist, MP or millionaire businessman. The informal ‘let’s get a coffee’ culture is very much alive, and locks out those who aren’t part of the same gang.”

The 14 interviews also revealed that the majority of BAME-led indies feel more progress has been made on screen than off, a notion backed up by results from the Broadcast Indie Survey in March.

The survey revealed that 66% of more than 100 production fi rms felt that ‘some progress’ was being made in diversity on screen, while this fell to 44% off screen. Only 7% of respondents said ‘great strides’ were being made off screen, compared with 16% on screen.
... See MoreSee Less

Broadcast Magazine. 29th May 2019.

BAME-led indies locked out

Producers claim they are still not trusted to deliver diverse shows despite better credentials

The UK’s BAME-led production community say broadcasters have a greater appetite for diverse programming than ever before – but claim they are not trusted to deliver it.

Broadcast spoke to 14 indies including Roughcut TV, Douglas Road Productions and Transparent TV about their experiences. A major theme to emerge is that the group still struggle to land commissions despite often having the most authentic experience of diverse topics and narratives.

“We are starting to see more ‘diverse’ work being commissioned, but it is being made by predominantly white, privileged companies, which are then coming to us for talent,” said Fraser Ayres, chief executive and co-founder of Triforce Creative Network and subsidiary Triforce Productions.

“And the same commissioners are not responding to many companies that are already in a position to tell these stories authentically.”

Other issues raised in the interviews include a lack of access to commissioners and their preference for a stereotyped view of what constitutes a diverse narrative.

One indie boss said that a mainly white commissioner class is unconsciously failing to understand that BAME creatives see stories differently to them. “And if they do see that difference, they often don’t give it an equal value,” added the producer.

In February, the issue of authenticity was raised by a group of East Asian-British writers, who claimed it was “indefensible” that CBBC sitcom Living With The Lams had been initially developed and scripted with little input from writers and creatives from that community.

Josh Wilson, managing director of Chasing The Dream producer Wilson Worldwide Productions, told Broadcast he is increasingly concerned by the industry seeming to equate diverse people with a lack of qualifications.

“This is a narrow-minded way of thinking,” he said. “I consistently hear the term ‘training schemes’ when it comes to diverse individuals. Of course, training is important for everyone in the industry, but it shouldn’t be used as a reason to keep the door shut – as if what we do is rocket-science.”

Another common theme was a complaint about the informal culture of commissioning. One indie boss said: “Not everyone can be related to a high-profile newspaper columnist, MP or millionaire businessman. The informal ‘let’s get a coffee’ culture is very much alive, and locks out those who aren’t part of the same gang.”

The 14 interviews also revealed that the majority of BAME-led indies feel more progress has been made on screen than off, a notion backed up by results from the Broadcast Indie Survey in March.

The survey revealed that 66% of more than 100 production fi rms felt that ‘some progress’ was being made in diversity on screen, while this fell to 44% off screen. Only 7% of respondents said ‘great strides’ were being made off screen, compared with 16% on screen.

Broadcast Magazine. 28th May 2019.
Michael Portillo to examine Tory party crisis.
Channel 5 orders two-parter from Transparent TV.

Former cabinet minister Michael Portillo is to explore the existential problems facing the Conservative Party today in a two-part Channel 5 documentary.

On the day Theresa May announced her resignation as prime minister following a disastrous few months, Channel 5 has ordered Portillo: The Trouble with the Tory Party (2 x 60-minutes) from Transparent TV.

With the Conservatives hitting historic lows in opinion polls, the series will investigate how the once-stable political party has fallen into chaos and bitter in-fighting. As a former defence secretary, Portillo will be able to access key players and analyse the events that have split the party and the nation.

Over the two episodes, Portillo will meet Tory grandees including Michael Heseltine, George Osborne and William Hague and other party insiders who have all played a part in the Conservatives’ most pressing issue of recent times: Europe.

Produced by Argonon-owned Transparent, The Trouble with the Tory Party is due to air this summer, executive produced by Jazz Gowans and Ruairi Fallon. The series was commissioned by C5 factual commissioning editor Guy Davies.

It is Portillo’s fourth project for C5, and his third with Transparent. Previous shows include one-off Our Housing Crisis – Who’s to Blame? and four-part series Portillo’s Hidden History of Britain.

“Winston Churchill called for a United States of Europe, Ted Heath led Britain into the European Community, Margaret Thatcher said “No, no, no” to European integration, and Brexit has torn the Conservatives in two,” said Portillo.

“This series will explain the party’s hideous ructions over Britain’s place in Europe, which mirror the divisions in the nation.”

Gowans added: “This landmark, authored series sees him challenging key politicians – from both today and decades past – revealing the behind the scenes story and offering a rare window inside the corridors of power.”

“This is an incredibly timely piece with Michael’s top level insider insight into the political earthquakes that are shaking up British politics, and within the Conservative Party in particular,” added Davies. “Who better than Michael to present this series as someone who spent a political career
... See MoreSee Less

Broadcast Magazine. 28th May 2019.
Michael Portillo to examine Tory party crisis.
Channel 5 orders two-parter from Transparent TV.

Former cabinet minister Michael Portillo is to explore the existential problems facing the Conservative Party today in a two-part Channel 5 documentary.

On the day Theresa May announced her resignation as prime minister following a disastrous few months, Channel 5 has ordered Portillo: The Trouble with the Tory Party (2 x 60-minutes) from Transparent TV.

With the Conservatives hitting historic lows in opinion polls, the series will investigate how the once-stable political party has fallen into chaos and bitter in-fighting. As a former defence secretary, Portillo will be able to access key players and analyse the events that have split the party and the nation.

Over the two episodes, Portillo will meet Tory grandees including Michael Heseltine, George Osborne and William Hague and other party insiders who have all played a part in the Conservatives’ most pressing issue of recent times: Europe.

Produced by Argonon-owned Transparent, The Trouble with the Tory Party is due to air this summer, executive produced by Jazz Gowans and Ruairi Fallon. The series was commissioned by C5 factual commissioning editor Guy Davies.

It is Portillo’s fourth project for C5, and his third with Transparent. Previous shows include one-off Our Housing Crisis – Who’s to Blame? and four-part series Portillo’s Hidden History of Britain.

“Winston Churchill called for a United States of Europe, Ted Heath led Britain into the European Community, Margaret Thatcher said “No, no, no” to European integration, and Brexit has torn the Conservatives in two,” said Portillo.

“This series will explain the party’s hideous ructions over Britain’s place in Europe, which mirror the divisions in the nation.”

Gowans added: “This landmark, authored series sees him challenging key politicians – from both today and decades past – revealing the behind the scenes story and offering a rare window inside the corridors of power.”

“This is an incredibly timely piece with Michael’s top level insider insight into the political earthquakes that are shaking up British politics, and within the Conservative Party in particular,” added Davies. “Who better than Michael to present this series as someone who spent a political career
Thank you SO much to our amazing Production Manager, Amanda, for all of your fabulous help over the last couple of weeks! Its been brilliant having you on board X
Thank you so much to our amazing intern, Nana, for all of your hard work! We absolutely loved having you on the team. Good luck and lots of love from all at TTV x

 

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Guy Salisbury great chairs!

Thanks for all your hard work Lia. You have been absolutely amazing! Best of luck with the rest of your course. Love from all at TTV :)

We hope you enjoyed The Comeback of Ant McPartlin! If you missed it, switch over to Channel 5+1 now to catch up. ... See MoreSee Less

Don't miss our latest documentary The Comeback Of Ant McPartlin, celebrating one of entertainments top partnerships being reunited on our screens. Watch on Channel 5 at 9pm tonight! ... See MoreSee Less

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Who do I speak to about breach of contract from Michael Portillo Hidden Histories Series 2 Nov 2018 The Odeon Bradford? All the contacts i had dealings with prior to filming are no longer working for you? I am manager of The Sultans Of Swing who provided music and spent 8 hours there filming in March last year and promised credits on the broadcast which didn't happen. Many thanks, Julian Maxfield.

Tonight at 9pm on Channel 5 - The Comeback of Ant McPartlin.
A million thanks to our superstar intern Emily!! You have been absolutely amazing!!! Good luck with the rest of college! Love from all at TTV :)
Transparent Television would like to say a huge thank you to our fabulous PM Emma, who has moved on to her next project.
In an incredibly busy time, she performed like an absolute superstar!
We will all miss you tons and look forward to welcoming you back for one of our next new exciting projects! 😊

 

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Emma Pinching we miss you!

Welcoming our fabulous work experience Haritik :)

 

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wow that's good very good haritik xx

Tall isn't he? Or is Jazz not wearing her heels?

Happy Birthday to Jazz’s AMAZING assistant Guy :)
The dream team! DP Mike and cameraman John shooting in the Audio Dub of one of our exciting upcoming projects.
From left to right, our three wonderful new interns, Lia, Nana and Emily. Keep up the good work girls 😊